Saturday, May 30, 2009

Urban Indian Health Programs Grant Announced

Urban Indian Health Programs Grant

Eligible Applicants

Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)

Additional Information on Eligibility:

Urban Indian organizations, as defined by 25 U.S.C. 1603(h), limited to urban Indian organizations which meet the following criteria: " Received State certification to conduct HIV rapid testing (where needed); " Health professionals and staff have been trained in the HIV/AIDS screening tools, education, prevention, counseling, and other interventions for AI/ANs; " Developed programs to address community and group support to sustain risk- reduction skills; " Implemented HIV/AIDS quality assurance and improvement programs; and " Must provide proof of non-profit status with the application.

Agency Name

Indian Health Service


The Indian Health Service (IHS), Office of Urban Indian Health Programs (OUIHP) announces an open competition for the 4-in-1 Title V grants responding to an Office of HIV/AIDS Policy (OHAP), Minority AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) Initiative (MAI). This program is authorized under the authority of the Snyder Act, Public Law 67-85 and 25 U.S.C. 1652, 1653 of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, Public Law 94-437, as amended. This program is described at 93.193 in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA). This open competition seeks to expand OUIHP's existing Title V grants to increase the number of American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) with awareness of his/her HIV status. This will provide routine and/or rapid HIV screening, prevention, pre- and post- test counseling (when appropriate). Enhancement of urban Indian health program HIV/AIDS activities is necessary to reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS in the urban Indian health communities by increasing access to HIV related services, reducing stigma, and making testing routine.

Apply for the grant here.

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