Thursday, April 9, 2009

American Indian Scholarships Available for Crow Canyon Archaeological Center

Full scholarships are available for American Indian students who attend the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center's summer archaeology camps or field school in Cortez, Colo. These programs offer opportunities for students to learn about the cultural chronology of the Four Corners area, participate in archaeological field and laboratory work and visit archaeological sites. Any American Indian student from any tribe in the United States can apply.

Scholarships will be awarded for High School Field School, a three-week program to be held July 5 - 25; High School Archaeology Camp, a one-week program held July 26 - Aug. 1; and Middle School Archaeology Camp, a one-week introduction to archaeology held June 21 - 27.
Crow Canyon Archaeological Center
The scholarships are provided by Crow Canyon and cover the full cost of tuition and room and board for the program. Scholarship recipients will be responsible for their own travel costs.

Students enrolled in Crow Canyon programs will work on ancestral Pueblo (Anasazi) sites within the Goodman Point Unit of Hovenweep National Monument. They will excavate these sites, uncover ancestral Pueblo artifacts, and analyze materials in the laboratory. In accordance with Crow Canyon's human remains policy and current research design, the center does not seek out human remains as objects of study.

Contact Debra Miller for application information at (970) 564-4346 or (800) 422-8975, ext. 146, or e-mail her at


The Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, located in southwestern Colorado, is dedicated to understanding, teaching, and preserving the rich history of the ancestral Pueblo Indians (also called the Anasazi) who inhabited the canyons and mesas of the Mesa Verde region more than 700 years ago. The area has one of the densest concentrations of well-preserved archaeological sites in the world, attracting the interest of archaeologists, and capturing the imagination of the public, for well over 100 years.

Crow Canyon's campus-based programs allow you to participate in actual archaeological research, making exciting discoveries in the field and laboratory that add to our collective understanding of the Pueblo past. The Center’s award-winning research and education programs are developed in consultation with American Indians, whose insights complement the archaeological perspective and add a unique cross-cultural dimension to your experience.

In addition, Crow Canyon offers educational travel programs throughout the greater Southwest and around the world—tours that provide additional opportunities for the study of native cultures, both past and present.

Crow Canyon is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization and a licensed cam

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