Wednesday, June 11, 2008

Opportunity to Work on Indigenous Peoples Issues in the Peruvian Andes

The Center for Social Well Being is now in its 7th year offering our 3 week training program with courses in ethnographic field methods and languages - Spanish and Quechua - in the Peruvian Andes.

Founded in January 2000, the Center for Social Well Being is a non-profit organization dedicated to the enhancement of citizen participation to improve the lives and opportunities of children, youth and adults in Andean communities in Peru. They work to sensitize students and visitors to the region to global and local issues they can actively take part in to contribute to the development of mutual respect required for a just society. Their program team and partners consist of anthropologists, ecologists, agronomists, nutritionists, health workers, school teachers, herbalists, midwives, community members and leaders who collaborate in areas of research, training and civic participation to effectively analyze, prioritize and resolve issues of concern through the implementation of strategies aimed to improve social, health and environmental conditions.

The Centers intensive language courses are FLAS approved by the US Dept. of Education. Students will be housed at the center’s rural base, an adobe lodge on an ecological ranch in the Cordillera Blanca mountain range of the Callejón de Huaylas, 7 hours northeast of Lima. Coursework provides in-depth orientation to theory and practice in anthropological investigation that emphasizes methods in Participatory Action Research and Andean Ethnographycentered on themes of Health, Ecology, Biodiversity and Community Organization. Students will have the opportunity to actively engage in ongoing investigations in local agricultural communities to develop effective field research techniques, and to acquire language skills. In addition, the program provides excursions to museums, archaeological sites, glacial lakes and hotsprings; optional recreational activities include hiking, mountain biking, rafting, kayaking, rock climbing and trekking.

Total cost is $2,700 US dollars. This includes all in-country travel, food and accommodations at the rural center, and course materials. The program is under the direction of Applied Medical Anthropologist, Patricia J. Hammer, Ph.D., and Ecologist, Flor de María Barreto Tosi.

Program dates:

August 1st through August 21st
Biodiversity Session

September 17th through October 6
Ritual and Fiesta Session

For an application contact: phammer@wayna.rcp.net.pe

Or visit the Center for Social Well Being website.


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2 comments:

C said...

Thanks for your comment, Peter! :) I'm really glad that my friend e-mailed me that article - it certainly made me look at a much beloved character in a whole new light.

And as for this post... well, let's just say that it's opportunities like this one that make me wish I could be in two places at once. The Biodiversity Session sounds especially appealing... Alas, I think my students would not understand why I abandoned them before the school year even began. lol

Peter N. Jones said...

I agree C, these are some great programs and I would love to be a part of them. They have been really making a difference over the years.

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